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A brief explainer of the Whole-food Plant-based Diet

Here's a nice straightforward explanation of what the whole-food plant-based diet is that I would like to share with you. As you'll see, it's pretty simple really. And I like that they say at the end it's not really a "diet"; it's a "lifestyle".

That's how I like to think of it, and it's not something to be afraid of. "Diet" makes it sound like depriving ourselves to lose weight. But really the WFPB lifestyle is a complete change of heart in how we view what we choose to eat. Everything we put in our mouths we intend to be real, health-giving nutritious food. And it's not hard to find. It's just a matter of choice. Give it for health!

"The WFPB diet doesn’t include any meat, dairy, or eggs. It’s not, however, the same as a vegan diet, which is defined only by what it eliminates. A WFPB diet is defined also by what it emphasizes: a large variety of whole foods."

Take it away, Center For Nutrition Studies. Click this link to read their simple explanation of the whole-food plant-based "lifestyle".

https://nutritionstudies.org/what-is-a-whole-food-plant-based-diet/

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