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Breakfast Alternatives with Oatmeal

Cartoon by Bitstrips
I know a few people who don't like oatmeal, so I'm always on the lookout for breakfast alternatives for them that they might find agreeable.

Today is National Apricot day (You didn't know that? Shame on you!) and I turned up this recipe (linked at bottom of post) for baked oatmeal with apricots that might possibly overcome the oatmeal "slime barrier" that some encounter.

It just so happens that I added these delicious organic unsulphured dried apricots to my Amazon Subscribe and Save order that came this week, so I have all I need to give these a shot. They sound like they would also make great breakfasts-on-the-go that could be eaten in the car, or taken on the hiking trail.

Oatmeal is known to have the following health benefits, so it really is worth trying to make it part of your daily nutrition routine (Ref: Top 10 Health Benefits of Oatmeal):
  1. Oatmeal Lowers Cholesterol
  2. It Can Reduce The Risk Of Developing High Blood Pressure
  3. It’s Full Of Antioxidants
  4. It Prevents The Arteries From Hardening
  5. Oatmeal Can Prevent The Development Of Breast Cancer
  6. It Stabilizes Blood Sugar
  7. It Will Also Prevent The Development Of Diabetes
  8. It Gives The Immune System A Boost
  9. Eating Oatmeal Can Prevent Weight Gain
  10. Those Who Can’t Eat Gluten Can Eat Oatmeal

If you're "oatmeal averse" and give these baked oatmeal and apricot squares a shot, let me know what you think? Or if you have any other breakfast ideas for people who have trouble with oatmeal, please share.

Here's the link to the recipe: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/recipe-baked-oatmeal-with-apricot/

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