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Vegan Cheese

One thing that truly amazes me since going over to the dark side of the whole-food plant-based diet, is the ease with which I have given up cheese. Believe me, I was right up there with the cheeseaholics of the world. Once I started on it, I couldn't stop. Sometimes a selection of cheeses was my appetizer, main, and dessert! But when I adopted the WFPB diet, I just quit, and that was it. Don't ask how; I just did.

I have tried some of the vegan cheeses from Trader Joe's but nothing has struck me as all that tasty. It certainly hasn't compared to the "real thing". I see recipes for vegan cheese crop up a lot, and always think I must give it a shot, but haven't seemed to be able to find the time yet.

In today's hunt for vegan recipes I came across a posting about vegan cheese and the recipe sounds good and the writer sounds confident of it's tastiness. What's more, she sounds like she used to be just as big a cheeseaholic as I once was too, so if she says it's good, then it must be good.

By the way, I already have many of the essential ingredients for this recipe in my cupboards. I get them through Amazon on "subscribe and save". By committing to by the product on a schedule ranging from every month to every 6 months you get 5% off the item. If you have 5 or more items in your order for any particular month, then you get 15% off the entire order. Amazon Subscribe and Save orders are fulfilled once a month in the first week of the month.

Here are a couple of links to the items in the recipe that you can get on Amazon Subscribe and Save:

Navitas raw cashews
Bob's Red Mill Nutritional Yeast


Anyhow, without further ado, here's a link to the recipe for vegan cheese from One Green Planet.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-food/learn-how-to-make-dairy-free-cheese-at-home/

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